Musings on a Summer Evening

Snail 1 (1)

Last Night the Rain Spoke To Me
By Mary Oliver

Last night
the rain
spoke to me
slowly, saying,

what joy
to come falling
out of the brisk cloud,
to be happy again

in a new way
on the earth!
That’s what it said
as it dropped,

smelling of iron,
and vanished
like a dream of the ocean
into the branches

and the grass below.
Then it was over.
The sky cleared.
I was standing

under a tree.
The tree was a tree
with happy leaves,
and I was myself,

and there were stars in the sky
that were also themselves
at the moment,
at which moment

my right hand
was holding my left hand
which was holding the tree
which was filled with stars

and the soft rain—
imagine! imagine!
the wild and wondrous journeys
still to be ours.


As I go out of the door, taking my dog on the last walk of the day, my boot crushes a snail. I hear the sharp crunch and lift my boot, but it is too late. It’s pretty, with a yellow and brown striped shell. Not your average, drab common garden snail. Continue reading

Looking back at 2015

2015 was a good year — it brought new blogging adventures, my graduation, and an unexpected twist at the end of the year (you’ll have to read to the end of the post to find out about that).

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A piece of wisdom from Thomas Hardy

During the summer, I participated in the WordPress course Blogging 201, which gave me the boost I needed to refresh areas of my blog and plan for future posts.

I would have liked to post more often. My readership and reader engagement with the blog (i.e. via comments, follows and likes) increased during the two months when I posted my ‘Between the Pages’ series, with several themed posts about Jane Austen and Thomas Hardy. Continue reading

Fortified by Poetry

This week, I listened to Krista Tippett’s On Being interview with the poet Mary Oliver. Although I was familiar with Mary Oliver’s name, I knew nothing of her poetry other than the often-quoted final lines from The Summer Day:

Mary Oliver ~ Siyan Ren

Unsplash photo, courtesy of Siyan Ren

Continue reading

A Little Bit of Silliness

Here’s a little bit of silliness to make you smile on this Monday morning. I remember this rhyme from my childhood and it still makes me giggle.

(Rhyme: Anon. Graphic created by me, using Pinwords.com. Image sourced from PublicDomainPictures.net).

Do you remember any rhymes or limericks from your childhood which make you smile?

A woman’s best friend….

I have a guest staying for the day. He is very agreeable and has perfect manners. 🙂

sherlock

Joyful, joyful, joyful,
as only dogs know how to be happy
with only the autonomy
of their shameless spirit
” (Pablo Neruda, translated from the Spanish below)

“Alegre, alegre, alegre
como los perros saben ser felices,
sin nada más,
con el absolutismo de la naturaleza descarada”

Snow and Poetry

For Day 19 of Zero to Hero, the challenge is to “publish a post using a format you’ve never used before”. The slideshow below contains a photo gallery (a format which is new to me) of wintry pictures which I took a couple of years ago, plus a cento I composed to go with them. A cento is like a poetic mash-up, with lines from poems by different authors rearranged into a new, unique poem. For a wonderful example of a cento that the BBC recently produced as a promo for one of their channels, click here: BBC Cento.

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And here is my complete cento in order. All of the authors’ names and the titles of the poems are in the captions of the gallery slideshow. In respective order, I composed the cento with quotes from poems by Robert Frost, Emily Bronte, John Clare, Thomas Hardy, George Meredith and Samuel Taylor Coleridge.

The woods are lovely, dark and deep
And fifteen wild Decembers
From those brown hills have melted into spring.
The winter comes; I walk alone.

Around the house the flakes fly faster,
And all the berries now are gone.
Sharp is the night, but stars with frost alive
Leap off the rim of earth across the dome.

The secret ministry of frost
Shall hang them up in silent icicles,
Quietly shining to the quiet Moon.

Happy 2014!

Public domain image by Lilla Frerichs. Source: publicdomainpictures.net

Public domain image by Lilla Frerichs. Source: publicdomainpictures.net

I have been neglecting Cultural Life recently — my last post was on December 11. Oh dear!

Throughout most of the first half of December, I was busy studying (I have exams a week from today and I am counting down the days until they are over!) and then I was ill over Christmas and was unable to do much at all, apart from sleep. But it is a New Year now and I am expectantly looking forward to taking part in the Daily Post’s ‘Zero to Hero’ 30-day blogging challenge. If you want to take part, check it out here.

Happy New Year! And thank you to all of my readers and followers.

Weekly writing challenge: Starting Over

This week’s writing challenge from The Daily Post is a piece of creative writing on the theme, “Starting Over”. For more info, visit The Daily Post writing challenge: Starting Over.

Monarch Butterfly by Art Planet

Monarch Butterfly by Art Planet

La mariposa volotea
y arde — con el sol — a veces

“The butterfly flutters
And burns – with the sun – sometimes”

(from “La mariposa de Otoño” – The Autumn Butterfly – by Pablo Neruda)

Starting Over

Every year they come to Michoacán, filling the wide, open space of the space between earth and above with blood-red color. Las mariposas. They arrive each October, thousands of them tinting the sky with their delicate wings, as fierce dry winds blow down from the mountains, the red dirt swirling up like demons in a frenzy.

Continue reading